Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

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Msiuri

Old City

It’s a maze of crooked streets and balconies hanging overhead, famous Tbilisi yards and drying laundry everywhere. And squeezed among them are churches, mosques and synagogues – this city has always been home to all religions.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

The Bridge of Peace

This glass pedestrian bridge provoked many emotions among Tbilisi residents. Some declared it an architectural masterpiece, while others were of the opposite opinion. It is scenically lit up in the evenings and offers a nice view of the Old City.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Narikala Fortress

This fortress can be seen from any place in the city. It is the most ancient part of Tbilisi, which has survived through both the Arabs and Persians. It’s a good place for a walk and landscape pictures.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Metekhi Church

Standing on the rock of the same name, it can easily be called a meaningful center of Tbilisi. Actually, every other church is an observation deck here, but Metekhi is the best one. It offers views that Georgian kings had observed for centuries.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

The Sameba Cathedral

This cathedral immediately catches the eye. It’s the tallest church in Georgia. It was designed during Soviet times, but something always stood in the way of construction. It was finally finished in 2004. Today it’s the main cathedral of the country.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Mtatsminda Hill

This is one of Tbilisi’s surrounding hills, 2,430 feet tall. It’s famous for its cable car, built by the Belgians in 1905. The green park on the hill’s slopes is a favorite picnic place among the locals.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Sioni Church

The first Christian church emerged in this place in the 6th century AD, followed by periods of destruction, earthquakes and reconstruction. The resulting building consists of fragments dating back to different ages.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Tbilisi Sulphur Baths

These baths gave a name to the city, because Tbilisi literally means “warm.” According to legend, the city was founded when 1,500 years ago a Georgian king discovered the healing powers of these springs. Some baths are still functioning.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Presidential Palace

This is another controversial building, contrary to the general architectural look of the city. Because of the unusual dome people call it “the egg.” Unlike the strictly protected presidential residences of the eastern part of the continent, this one is open to visitors on pre-booked tours.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

National Museum

In 150 years the collection of this museum has survived several relocations. The most valuable items are medieval coins and ancient jewelry. One of the halls is dedicated to the times of Soviet occupation.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Anchishati Church

This is the oldest city building preserved until our day. It survived many conquests and ordeals. It’s quite plain with no extravagant decoration, but boasts the richest history in Tbilisi. 1,500 years after it was erected, it still works and conducts services.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Ethnographic Museum

It’s an open-air museum in Vake Park. It contains traditional houses and household buildings, collected from all regions of Georgia. It’s a whole country in miniature and is very popular among movie makers for a historical setting.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Freedom Square

Despite its modest size, this square frequently becomes the main arena for any political battles and demonstrations. It’s a good place to start a walking tour around Tbilisi, since the most prominent ancient streets take their beginning from it.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Puppet Theater

Even if one’s travelling without kids, this place is worth seeing. It’s an amazing crooked piece of architecture. Every day at noon there is a small performance when the clock starts chiming, and an angel appears from the window.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi

Msiuri

Msiuri is a children’s park, literally translated as “sunny.” There are many fabulous statues, and it often holds various events for children.

Key to the Caucasus: Tbilisi


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